Tally Ho With BaliYo

Tally Ho with BaliYo!

Fanning, backhand twirl, latch drop, flywheel!  No, this is not just a bunch of gibberish, these are just a few of many Balisong knife tricks I came across.  Learning to flip a balisong can be intimidating, and often times painful.  Well thanks to Spyderco’s BaliYo Pen Buttery Flipper, it doesn’t have to be anymore.

spyderco-baliyo-pen-butterfly-flipper-black-large

I’ve always wanted to learn to flip a butterfly knife.  It’s been one of those bucket list things, but I kept putting it off.  There was always an excuse, I didn’t want to drop a fortune on a nice one, but I also didn’t want to just blow money on a bad knock off. Not to mention I wasn’t too keen slicing and dicing my own hand.  I had pretty much dismissed the idea until I saw the BaliYo.  Affordable, durable, and totally safe.  This is the perfect learning tool for beginners like myself.  Lightweight (only .92 oz.) this is ideal for you to take in your pocket and practice anywhere.  While lighter than most Balisong knives, its weighted ends help to make sure it reacts and flips just like a regular balisong.

On the flip side (see what I did there?), it’s a great pen.  I take mine to school with me and take notes with it.  You would think that flipping it around this way and that would mess with the ink, but it works perfectly.  I don’t need to scribble with it before using it, it works great every time I open it.  The pen itself is retractable, so you do not need to worry about getting ink all over yourself when you are flipping.

Fun and functional, you just cannot beat something like that.  Between $6.95-9.99, it’s super affordable for the beginning flipper, or the expert flipper who just wants to flip in the office or on the go.  This is easily one of the best ways to begin flipping, especially since it comes with instructions to get you started on at least 6 beginner tricks. I bought one for myself and I am already loving it, I have only been able to practice for about 15 minutes and I have already started to get a couple of tricks down.

These do not have to be just for beginners either.  Veteran flippers will get a kick out of it.  Being able to flip in places you couldn’t have before, you can carry it with you in the office, the bus, Doctor’s office, practically anywhere.  As I said before, I take mine to class with me and have not once had an issue.  A couple of raised eyebrows?  Yes.  But no issues.   Completely legal, after all, it’s just a pen.  The perfect gift for the flipper in your life.  Hurry fast though, these guys won’t last long.

Got some tips or tricks for the beginners?  Have you been able to practice with the BaliYo?  Let us know in the comments below!

 

For those of you wanting to start flipping, here are some links I found helpful when I was starting.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Balisong-Knife-Butterfly-Knife-Simple-open/

http://www.butterflyknife.com/butterflyknives/beginner-butterfly-tricks/2012/06/

http://tag.wonderhowto.com/easy-balisong-moves/

Knife Handle Materials

Several months ago I did a post on different knife handle materials. The post wasn’t super extensive though, so we’re going to talk a little bit more about them today. Blade HQ ­­made a pretty sweet infographic that goes over the different types of materials used in knives, specifically the ones you’re most likely to find in butterfly knives. The infographic includes materials I didn’t mention in my post, and they’re broken up into material categories, which I think is pretty useful. Before I get into all the different materials, take a moment to look over the infographic:

Materials used for Knife Handles

I’m not going to hit on every single handle material in the infographic, but as I said before, I’ll touch on the materials you’re likely to see in butterfly knives, especially the ones you’ll find on the Blade HQ website.

Different Knife Handle Materials

I mentioned that the materials are broken up into categories, the first of which is “synthetics.”

What are synthetics? From what I’ve gathered, synthetics are materials that are produced through chemical processes (in other words, they are man-made materials). Basically, you’re not just going to find these materials in nature.

Here are a few synthetics you can expect to find in butterfly knives:

G-10 : As stated in the infographic, G-10 is “glass-reinforced epoxy laminate made of woven fiberglass cloth with epoxy resin.” The benefits of G-10 are that it doesn’t really absorb water and it’s strong. Another thing I really like about G-10 is that often, it provides good gripping, which comes in handy.

Micarta: You probably won’t see Micarta super often in balisongs. I, for one, have mostly seen it in custom butterfly knives. It’s very durable and light, and it is “thermoset composite material with layers of fibers transfused with resin.”

Carbon Fiber: This is my (and probably every other person on the planet’s) favorite handle material of all time. It’s just so sleek and classy… what’s not to like? What the material actually is, is “fiber-reinforced polymner with carbon fibers.” It is very strong for how light it is, and it is often found on higher-end models of butterfly knives (and knives in general).

 

Next, there are a few different types of metal handles you might see in butterfly knives. Since we’ve already touched on them briefly in the Butterfly Knives blog, I’ll just quickly hit on their main points.

Aluminum: Aluminum is very light, which can be beneficial if you favor flipping with a lightweight knife. However, because aluminum is light, it’s also not as strong as many other materials. Additionally, aluminum typically doesn’t have great corrosion resistance unless it has been anodized.

Titanium: Who doesn’t love Titanium? I mean, really? It’s really lightweight and really strong (it has a high strength-to-weight ratio).

Stainless Steel: Stainless steel is a super common material in knives, butterfly or not. The benefits of the material are it is resistant to corrosion (obviously), and it is relatively strong. You’ll probably see it in knife blades more often than in knife handles.

 

The last type of handle material I’m going to hit on is natural materials. These are pretty self-explanatory, but they include materials like wood, bone, and pearl—materials you can find in nature that don’t have to be made by man. These materials are beautiful and add a lot to the aesthetics of a knife, thought they might not be the strongest or easiest to maintain.

 

So these are knife handle materials in a nutshell! What balisong handle material is your favorite?

 

Best Butterfly Knife for Under $250

best butterfly knife for under 250

There are a lot of butterfly knives out there. Sometimes it’s hard to know exactly how much to spend on a butterfly knife when there are so many options to consider. What price will get you the best quality? What price will leave you satisfied with your product not sulking at the drastic drop your … Continue reading